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will be recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of the nuclear energy sector, not only do nuclear power plants provide affordable, reliable and clean energy, they also provide many quality high-paying jobs and are the backbone of many communities. my district is shome to a nuclear plant -- is home to a nuclear plant that employs near 700 people. nuclear energy is a secure energy source that plays a vital role in a responsible, all-of-the-above energy policy. mr. davis: it is the biggest provider of reliable, efficient, clean energy and it provides on-demand energy 24/7. the recent record cold temperatures in the midwest show the importance of energy diversification. many of my constituents saw steep increases in their electric bill. while pipes froze and transportation became difficult because of iced roads and bridges, nuclear power remained consistent. i worry that things could have become worse if nuclear power wasn't able to fill the gaps where needed. this is why i stand here today in support of nuclear energy and all of my constituents and the hardworkin
the east of core ukraina lot of russian speakers there, fireworks in terms of energy prices in terms terms of energy prices in europe. >> europe depends on the infrastructure, tried to diversify a way away from russian energy, through the cast pecaspea sea. >> because the domestic supplies from these critical producers are dhoining, that really -- declining that really the pipeline supplies at a will be available for europe will be -- that will be available will be largely from russian gas. >> european leaders understand that, that's why they are calling for dialogue with, not sanctions against, russia. ali velshi, al jazeera. >> warren hogue, and from providence, rhode island, thomas nichols, professor of national security affairs. gentlemen, welcome. >> thank you. >> warren, let me start with you if i might. angela merkel suggested that the russian president is out of touch with reality tonight. is that just rhetoric or they have just lost control? >> i think what she said was he was from a different planet. i think exactly he is from a different planet. the russians view this differentl
stock for 10-plus years, other than the energy sector, and that is where we thought the lifting of all of that public policy and certainty related to all of the government issues we have had the last two years, that would be the main driver and that durable a much more placed to pick consumer oriented companies. indexdid see the pricing today -- it went up a point more than people thought, giving some hope it would rebound a little bit. but guess what? the r&d taxon of credits last year. congress did not renew those. we are seeing bid increases -- big increases in november and december. we have seen nothing in february so far. what we do not know is whether we will see that building and, whether there was a temporal, prime shift with black -- prime shift -- >> you think that is inevitable? >> the good part of the durable goods report last month, or last week showed a big pickup in january. we had in industrials conference. we got a lot of positive .necdotes from these companies they are much more interested in capital spending or even nurtures and acquisitions than vying back stocks. i
an interesting note this morning, there's energy in the ukraine that could supplant the russians as far as being a supplier to western europe. there's a lot of things going on here. we'll hear more about it. this isn't going to go away. >> david molnar, you point out we're hovering around the fifth anniversary of the beginning of this bull market from the lows of march of '09. it's getting long in the tooth. is this market just running out of steam. is this a good excuse to sell today? >> yeah, bill, i think that's exactly what we're seeing here is that the market is a little bit extended, a little bit tired after a big run here off the january lows. we needed to see something come along that would create an impetus for consolidation, even a short-term correction, and this happens to be it right now. i agree with the prior two guests that this is probably going to be a short-term correction. it's not necessarily, you know, a change in trend here, but i would point out we do have friday's employment report coming out that's going to dictate a lot about, you know, the future direction of fed polic
. to the extent we could impose energy sanctions on russia, understandable and effect because they rely so much but i would go one more step and say by 2020 we are expected to be the world's leading producer of energy and there's talk about exporting natural gas, we need to make it clear we need to start planning for the long game and we will have natural gas with allies that reliance on russian gas to be accountable. stuart: it is all about energy, isn't it? a lot of europe is supplied with natural gas, a lot of that comes through ukraine and from russia. therefore, there is a limit to a and forbid its natural gas to get into europe. the europeans will never look at that. stuart: we have to take into account the effect this will have on their economy, doing things that will affect their allies may not be beneficial but if the president came out today, he won't but if he came out today and said we are an energy powerhouse we are committing that in ten years we have great contract with our allies that would scare the russians. vladimir putin does things with long hall and he knows is only play i
this is a tiny economy and russia is a third world economy for its energy sector but the point is -- bob, let me go to you. the point is europe could get involved, natural gas shutdowns could get involved and these kinds of tensions have a way of rippling through. i like this reuters announcement, i'm going to assume it's true. i like the sound of it. the stock market may not like the sound of it because it's the united states being tough and kind of in your face to putin. let's face it, bob, putin's thugs have taken over the sovereign state of crimea, ended the legislature, ended the prime minister and therefore we've got to do something about that. >> correct. forget these statistics. the ukraine is one quarter of one percent of whatever. 1997, larry, i was down on the floor of the new york stock exchange when the tide bot collapsed and nobody was saying that tie land was an important part of the economy but the ripple effects around the world were felt in other economies. it's the butterfly wings in africa that causes storms in the united states. >> it was the anchovies off the coast of peru.
goes up. i will stay stock specific and oil names like encan ma and new star energy. i take off a lot of risk across the board. go back to my screen and take some risk off going into this situation on friday. melissa: don't move. i want to get some more reaction from you in just a moment. >> budget i sent congress this morning lays out how we'll implement this agenda in a balanced and responsible way. it's a road map for creating jobs with good wages and expanding opportunity for all americans. melissa: so the president released his budget proposal today. his direction is clear. he wants to tighten guidelines for the rich. extend tax breaks for the poor and help students with loans and raise the minimum wage to 10 person $10 an hour. thanks for joining us. -- $10.10 an hour. >> thanks, melissa. melissa: what do you like about what you heard? >> most republicans and democrats agree the earned income tax credit actually works. i think that is positive. some of the ideas on infrastructure were way behind. we're hopelessly behind on infrastructure spending in this country. we'll have to d
of their energy supplies and actually we have seen a significant recession in european leadership over the last ten to 20 years. but we need to act and we need to speak up in favor of the people who are now being overtaken in crimea by vladimir putin's army, his military. and i worry and -- in conclusion i say it's time we woke up about vladimir putin. it's time that this administration got real. and it's also time for us to worry about what vladimir putin will do on eastern ukraine on the pretext that somehow disorder and demonstrations might require russian presence. and my friends, if we allow mr. putin to assert his authority over these areas because of russian-speaking people, that message is not lost on poland, where there's russian population, on romania, on latvia, estonia, lithuania and moldova, and we are on the verge possibly of seeing a move to reassert the old russian empire, which is mr. putin's lifelong ambition. madam president, i've overstayed my time. i thank my colleague from alabama and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: madam president? the presiding officer: the sen
, pointing out that russia is germany's biggest supplier of energy. we know that merkel spoke with our president last night. she spoke with putin several times since the crisis started. could she be a key player in potentially resolving this situation? >> yes. absolutely. i mean, germany, after all, is the most important military and economic power in europe. the problem here, as you rightfully point out, is that most of germany's natural gas supplies run through that natural gas pipelines through ukraine, from russia, to germany. she's already signaled that she's not in favor of imposing economic sanctions on russia. well, if she's not in favor of supporting economic sanctions on -- on russia as well as denying russia a space in the g-8 and turning that into the g-7, it sort of defangs the capacity of the united states to act forcefully with putin if he decides that, well, what -- what matters to him if he moves his forces into eastern ukraine. who's going to stop him. >> yeah, and josh, i also want to touch on the energy and economics issues which are important here. >> yeah. >> a lo
-up. 5.5 million euros per day. russia is a major exporter of energy to europe and a lot of those pipelines go through ukraine. this is a fear premium put into the price of energy and it is affecting our everyday prices. charles: it has applications to the idea this will be east-west, for tat economic sanctions. to a large degree europe needs that oil. sandra: this is also being seen as an opportunity for the united states. the reopen of the discussion of the keystone pipeline, more exports of liquefied natural gas. this could be an opportunity for the united states. charles: oil was already breaking out before this crisis. anything else going on beneath the surface other than the headlines? sandra: it is a safe haven buying. people want to own something other than equities because they see those as the riskiest assets to own right now. charles: a huge move up $31, what is it? gold has one of the roughest years ever last year, now all of a sudden it is seen as a safe haven, why is it a safe haven? sandra: everybody institutionally are piling on. the most bullish they have been on
the effects of reduced energy subsidies from russia. that's why ukrainians have been getting oil and gas and been able to do it cheaply. now that they want to rebuild the economy, they need to work with the imf on this. one of the things the imf is looking for them to do is raise energy prices. a lot is geared toward the energy factor. u.s. is sending technical advisors to work with the government on energy reforms and other types of financial reforms that they need to do to rebuild the economy. they also want to help the ukrainian businesses. they're talking about further assistance. they'll be sending advisors to work on anticorruption and recovering. is it enough? don't know. the ukrainians said they need $30 billion to rebuild the economy. this is a drop in the bucket. >> obviously the administration has been trying to motivate and rally members of the european union to join them in threatening at the at least sanctions and of punishments against the russian government and individuals in the russian government perhaps. i'm wondering what you've heard about the difficulties the u.s. h
,hose particularly energy. this has been about for the russian economy. the currency has fallen. the stock market is down. there was a reaction to this that may affect putin's economy. but i mention one other thing? is this beautiful and large country called ukraine. suppose ukraine finally after failing in 2004 get it right -- democracy, gets rid of corruption, the economy is improving, and it is there of the border for russia. i think it makes him nervous if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia. if the sanctions fail? what do you do it the pressure with his he continues own ambitious ideas of expanding within his own borders and spears of influence? >> go back to georgia in nato. if you tried something like that ay with one area that has significant russian popularity -- population, he would be attacking nato. that would be an entirely different set of circumstances. i have no illusions that in the short term, we will be able to ambitions.tin's in the long term, we can curb those ambitions in many ways, b
bilateral and multilateral interactions. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? the economic situation in russia may be more marvel to economic pressures than most -- may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he is to suffer under, willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. what is the point of all this? putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. many russians believe that crimea is russian territory. the people there identify as russian and crimea should always be a part of russia. there is a nationalistic element , a domestic, political element. has aly, putin long-standing policy of projecting russian power. some will say it is an effort to reconstitute the soviet bloc. i t
is leading the charge in developing alternative energy bio fuel from one of the world's most abundant life points to algae fossil fuels like oil rapidly disappearing. finding the new energy sources is critical. that's right touch of meats more authentic eco energy is finding ways to help local and international energy suppliers and infrastructure companies go green the algae is extracted because not only reduces climbed outside and smoke stacks. it also doesn't compete with cops for farmland. algae as a biofuel could produce thirty times more oil per acre than other crops such as corn and sugarcane. it will also be non toxic juice milk salt provide context and that i don't agree quickly the dpp group and the ppt fee of up to the twentieth anniversary of the eu single market we're also looking at the future of the single market and how it can cause acute europe's economic revival by creating more jobs and strong regret. perhaps the most promising prospects is the digital single block in the sector. abbas potential to win hearts our lives and our prosperity early this year the european commi
the energy situation. thank god, the weather is going to get warmer soon. he has those levers. he has an overwhelming military capability. there are many, many things, but particularly energy. but, you know, this has been bad for the russian economy. the value of their currency has fallen, the stock market is down. there is a negative reaction to this, too, that may effect putin's economy. and could i mention one other aspect of this is putin also sees -- here's this beautiful and large and magnificent country called ukraine. suppose ukraine, finally, after failing in 2004, gets it right, democracy, gets rid of corruption, economy is improving, and it's right there on the border of russia. so i think it makes him very nervous, if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia, as you know, which is propped up by energy. >> charlie: should we revisit the question of georgia and nato? >> yes. i really believe that we should sponsor the inclusion of georgia into nato. every few weeks the russians move the fe
different ways. obviously rising gas prices along with energy prices on the rise in general. already trading near the highs of the year, partly on concerns about supply disruptions with russia and ukraine. higher grain prices as well or even food prices. ukraine, remember, is a major exporter of wheat and corn. if you pair that with some of the weather issues we have been having, you could see higher sticker prices for your food. then there are american companies with direct exposure to ukraine, like accounting firm pwc. we reached out to them. they came back to us. they actually had to close offices in two different locations. they said although they were briefly closed all of pwc's offices in the ukraine are now open. there are other american companies that we found with business in ukraine. cargill, abbott labs, both no comment. adm, no significant business impact but it's monitoring. baker mckenzie, the first international law firm to open its doors in ukraine in the early '90s, they told me they are keeping an eye on this situation under constant review and employees there are allowed t
.com. >>> the power of oil and gas, russia is a big energy supplier to europe, and that has global suppliers worried. we'll talk to ali velshi about that. >>> discussions at the white house between the leaders of israel and the united states. >>> an emergency session today at the white house. john terrett is life. the russians called this meeting. what were they trying to achieve? >> this was the third meeting in four days at the united nations security council. they have been talking only about ukraine and specifically about crimea. the russians called this meeting, and they wanted to put moscow's point of view to the rest of the world to explain what they really feel of the country of ukraine and the region of crimea. the long-standing ambassador to the united nations, read a letter which he said came from viktor yanukovych who was moscow's man until a couple of weeks ago, and called for russian forces to intervene in ukraine to save the country. afterwards they came out and read threater again. >> the country is in the grip of outright terror and violence driven by the west. in this context i app
to alternative energy. we have that story covered. >> the big day at the supreme court. they determine the fate of shareholder class action worth $80 billion in 20 years. we are streaming on your smart phone and your tablet. all of our interviews are live and on-demand on apple tv. ♪ biggest package shipping company is making another investment in alternative fuel. we are talking ups. compositionange the of the ups fleet in the united states. we recently went inside ups. you say the vehicles run on a variety of fuels. >> they do a lot. they have hybrids, pure electrics, cng compressed natural gas -- they have propane. they have had propane up in canada. the news today, they will make a $70 million investment to buy 1000 propane trucks. they're going to install about 50 fueling stations at various ups stations. they are introducing this propane fleet in the u.s. this will replace trucks in role areas. rural areas. they will reduce the use of ofut 3.5 million gallons diesel and gasoline. >> the purpose -- saving money. >> they have a couple of initiatives. whethera company -- it's looking at th
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is announcing a $1 billion energy subsidy package. moscow amid worries that was ready to stretch its military rich further into the mainland. your reaction? guest: is a good sign the tangible support. it is important to remember that the united states along with russia and great written in 1994 -- in great britain in 1994 made certain assurances to the ukraine, and russia is now in violation. they need to respond to support ukraine and look for ways to in allies russia until they cease military action. host: president vladimir putin back, but saides that russia reserves the right to protect russians in the country and he accused the u.s. of encouraging an unconstitutional he hopes russia will not need to use force in predominantly russian-speaking eastern ukraine . guest: there is a certain irony there. first of all, president vladimir fled.ch when the agreement was signed, the russian representative refused to witness it. .here is a certain irony it has not been carried out because viktor yanukovych fled to russia. host: let's start with mario in connecticut on the line for democrats. good m
objectives affected by energy issues. while the national debate is over, tubes and mobile biological weapons labs, internal documents note that increased oil production in a post war iraq would have the vul effect of reducing world oil prices. >> prior to our even going to war in iraq, the focus was on oil. and iraqi oil and how to take it over far more than anything else. >> joining me now is rachel maddow, the host of the "the rachel maddow" show and "why we did it." what is the answer after all of your work on this? >> i think, andrea, the question is the most important part, which is the decisions of our generation on national security are determined more than anything by what the george w. bush administration did with that nine-year war in iraq and alongside of the 13-year war in afghanistan that's still going on. the american people are against those wars. those are the determine tif constraint for thinking about everything from crimea to syria to what the overall size of the u.s. military is. if we want avoid those protracted foreign -- we can't make good decisions until we understand
energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. ask your doctor about a
on exports and direct investment in the russian energy infrastructure and business -- >> you think that's sufficient to back off -- i want to get our other experts in. but so far they're not connected or at least not connected with me. i apologize to the viewers on that. we'll get them on. let me stay with this, benn steil. german's foreign minister has been making unpersuasive sounds in all the reports today. he doesn't seem to want to go along with the drill about preparation for g-8 or not going to the g-8 meeting in sochi. i haven't heard a thing. you ascribe that to natural gas? that's it? >> it's not just natural gas. it's the business that german industrial outfits like siemens are doing within russia. and the russians know very well when they invaded the breakaway georgian republics like south ossetia in 2008, the west did absolutely nothing. so this is playing according to script. >> do we have general mccaffrey? >> i think so. >> i beg your pardon, for whatever snafu we had. let me ask you the question about this 5:00 a.m. deadline and whether russia is going to tell ukraine t
-- of its energy from russia, from russian natural gas. sometimes it goes even higher than that. so they are going to be very reluctant to do the kind of comprehensive sanctions which would deprive them of that energy. and as you point out, london's role as a financial center is dependent upon other things, russia's capital. i think we should push for as comprehensive sanctions as we can get. you're never going to get totally comprehensive sanctions, but they do exact a price. and what we're trying to do here, as i see it, what the united states is trying to do with many members of the international community, make russia pay some price, some significant price, isolate it, and send a signal that this is not how we want business to be conducted in the 21 s century. you're not going to be able to stop it in its tracks. you're not going to be able to send troops into crimea. but the fact that we can't get 100% leak proof sanctions doesn't mean we shouldn't try to raise the bar and exact some price. >> i would like you to listen, fareed, to what the secretary of state, john kerry, said
the in stability could affect the global economy. one of the main concerns is energy, ukraine's strategically linked russia to the rest of europe. and russia supplies 25% of europe's gas needs. half of that gas is pumped via pipelines. moscow, we know it has cut can off the flow in past disputes with kiev. it could push up businesses and households. the price of oil is $2 a barrel. a barrel of crude oil costing $111. meanwhile, russia's stock market has dropped around 10% today. and russia's currency is at its lowest point ever against the dollar and the euro. markets around europe have seen sharp falls. take a look. there we go. what the markets are doing. ftse 100, london's main market, down 2%. the dax taking a serious hit there. down 3%. let's get more. andrew joins us from our business newsroom. great to have you with us. we know why the markets are down. i want to talk about specifics. let's talk about gas. that strategic link ukraine has i guess. here's a question. can europe afford those taps to be turn ted off? >> no. i suppose on the other hand you have to say russia can't afford th
of resources, particularly of energy and very particularly of natural gas. here in the united states we use a lot of natural gas but it's domestically produced. europe saw about a 10% spike in natural gas prices. about 40% of the natural gas schooled in europe comes from russia and goes through appliance that go through the ukraine. europe has been trying to diversify the source of gas supply for quite some time but hasn't been able to do it. russia controls the amount of natural gas that goes into europe. germany has a lot of factories. natural gas is not just for heating, it generates electricity which these factories use. if there was a sustained increase in the price of gas or if russia were to shut down the natural gas flow you would see the real problem in europe which is why europe may not be as keen to impose sanctions on russia as america is. >> worries of retaliation there. ali velshi host of "real money," thanks for being with us. >> okay joie. >> anxiety hit ordinary ukrainians and hard. the local currency is losing value, no bread, no eggs, only expensive imported italian spagh
you'd treat you. get the it card and see your fico® credit score. but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell
is in the top 50, i think. the larger point is energy and sitting on a bunch of oil is not where the action is. there is action obviously in tech. there are more new retail billionaires than tech. 35 retail billionaires. the business of buying things is still very good. >> mark zuckerberg last year worth $13.3 billion and this year $28.5. >> nobody in the world made more money in the past 12 months than mark zuckerberg. >> he is 29, everybody. incredible. randall, a great issue. thanks so much. "forbes" billionaire's list is out now. >>> david remnick was the bureau chief for "the post" in washington in moscow and he joins us with his thoughts on ukraine straight ahead. take a closer look at your fidelity green line and you'll see just how much it has to offer, especially if you're thinking of moving an old 401(k) to a fidelity ira. it gives you a wide range of investment options... and the free help you need to make sure your investments fit your goals -- and what you're really investing for. tap into the full power of your fidelity green line. call today and we'll make it easy to move that o
to the world economy. that's the help of many countries. russia's economy is dependent on energy crisis. russia supplies much of europe's gas through pipelines that crisscross ukraine. during disputes, russia cutoff the pipelines causing them to soar. russia's stocks took the steepest dive in five years. let's take a look at how the stocks are doing. the dow is down a little over 160 points. let's bring in the host of quest means business in london. richard, how are the stocks reacting in london where you are. >> in all the markets you are seeing, heavy sell offs. in germany. the index closed down 1/2 1/2%. germaniy has huge business relations the. a lot of economic interests with russia. if there looks to be any form of sanctions and economic effect between the west and russia, germany is one of the first economies that will certainly feel the pinch on this side of that. london was down 1 1/2%. paris similarly. ukraine as such economically. both because of those pipelines and because any form of economic standoff between russia, the united states, the european union is absolutely so serious, t
this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ >>> it looks like russian forces are consolidating on crimean. up to 12 trucks of russian troops have crossed into the eastern city of kerch from russia and the movement is being described by ferry. how far will russia go? the retired u.s. army general is joining me. thanks for coming in. if you take a look at russian forces versus ukrainian forces, 845,000 russian troops, 129,000 russian troops, tanks, two to one, combat aircraft, nearly 1400. russian combat aircraft, 221. there's no match. >> no. >> between those two militaries. so if it came down to a war between ukraine and russia, it's over. >> but ukraine has -- is part of a much larger organization in the european community and i don't think it would just be russia against ukraine. >> let's talk about that. let's hope the russias don't decide to move beyond crime and move eastward toward kiev arguing that the president yanukovych, he's still the president, he needs help to --
between russia, ukraine, and germany with a flow of energy? >> that is really the threat point that russia has in all of this, is europe is crucially dependent on natural gas, most of which comes from russia. that is always the -- obviously, russia needs to sell the natural gas, too. so far, that is why it has been stable. >> there's a terrific book "command and control" about the u.s. history and the disturbing -- clearly still on the minds of germans. >> casting a long shadow of the history. we will be back and talk about real estate. how can a real estate company survive commission-free? that is coming up next on "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> this is "bloomberg surveillance." let's get you some company news. a hiring spree in asia. they have hired hundreds of engineers and supply chain managers in china and taiwan. triesring comes as apple to speed product development and introduce a wider range of devices. ebay director firing back at carl icahn saying he recused himself from deal talks when ebay sold skype to a group of investors that included his venture firm. carl icahn has accus
's not alone. >> hopefully put some good energy into the world and get something back. >> this club has been around for years and several dozen former members are now working. aljazeera, new york. >> to learn more about job clubs and how they can help you, go to our website aljazeera.com/realmoney. >> in an hour, we'll get the latest reading on economic growth. governments to slash estimates for 2013. consumers cutting back on their spending. the slowdown in the global economy taking its toll on exports. >> the strength in u.s. manufacturing's going to have to come domesticically. we're not going to see exports grow as strongly as the fourth quarter of 2013, putting strain on manufacturing, along with the turn in the u.s. inventory cycle. >> we'll have the gross domestic product report four in our next hour here on aljazeera america. >> wall street is pointing to a lower open ahead of data, dow futures down 22 points. fed chair janet yellen soothing economy concerns yesterday gave stocks a lift, the dow beginning at 16,272, the s&p beginning with a new record high, 1854 and the nasdaq at 431
providing more energy to europe. europe depends on russian gas. putin is banking on that, that europe won't act in this situation. we could start in the long term changing that energy balance. getting more american gas to europe. >> mr. ambassador, where can the west find leverage over russia? the u.s. needs to work with them. it's not an isolated incident. we have syria we have iran. david is just talking about the major economic and energy ties there with europe. so where does the leverage come from? >> i think we should not overstate the problems of pushing back very hard against the russians. the russians, yes, they are trying to be somewhat helpful in our conversations with iran. and we need them to do something on syria, but they've not been key to either of these. certainly not on the iran side. we can deal with the iran negotiations on nuclear, without the russians. so i don't think we should be constrained by other issues to a great degree. and pushinging back very hard against this russian aggression. >> david, do you get the sense that president putin wants to actually claim cr
they crashed twitter with that retweet. they were all in such a good mood last night, the energy was fantastic and it really translated to the tv. >> reporter: i don't want to call myself a thief but i did get you a gift. >> you didn't steal that oscar. >> reporter: and the oscar goes to michaela pereira. >> it's chocolate. >> reporter: i got really high there. that is not going to be eaten. >> i was robbed. i was robbed. it was politics. >> you're supposed to say i was just honored to be nominated. >> i say go with authentic. i showed up because i thought i was going to win. >> what a fun night for lupita, what a fun night for her brother. >> coming up on "new day," we're going to take you back to the crisis in ukraine. it's a battle about sovereignty but it's also a battle about east and west and russia. it could have an effect in the global economy and we're going to tell you why. [ garner ] there's a lot of beautiful makeup out there, but one is so clever that your skin looks better even after you take it off. neutrogena healthy skin liquid makeup. 98% saw improved skin. does your makeup d
an on russia for much of its energy, more than 30% of the e.u.'s oil and gas, and under 30% of their coal is imported from russia. >> overtime, this will be a costly proposition for russia. now is the time for them to consider whether they can serve their efforts in a way that resorts to diplomacy. as opposed to force. lou: president meeting with his national security council on ukraine. question, is how muchhat only of the ukraine will putin take for now. joining us, fox news straggic analyst, lieutenant world knoll -- world knoll ralph meters, are they beyond in your equipment crimea. >> let me put nonsense about negotiation, and sanctions and how obama is going to punish putin in perspective, putin now owns ukraine, he will never give it back, he now owns it in a matter of time it will join russian fedding a,ration -- federation, the question is how much more will he gobble and when? i am really concerned, i think that he sees it in for a penny in for a pound issue he has crimea why not just do it all now get all of the cavities pulled out during the same visit at the dentist. he does
to broaden this conflict into those regions which are on the transit suits then we could see energy prices in europe. >> reporter: it depends on russia natural gas and infrastructure of pipes that brings it in from russia and through the ukraine. europe tried to diversify a way by divesting in pipelines to the caspean sea and africa and gas fields in norway but growth for natural gas will eat up much of the new potential supply. >> europe is primarily still pipeline gas market because the domestic supply from these critical producers are declining that really the pipeline supplies that will be available for europe will be largely from russia gas. >> reporter: european leaders understand this and they are calling for dialog with not sanctions against russia. >> reporter: the throat of economic sanctions is taking a toll on the currency and hit a record low on monday. 36.37 rubels against the dollar. we will continue following the events in ukraine as they unfold. in our next hour we will get the russian perspective from a former advisor to the kremlin and you can get up to the minute info
. russia is a major energy producer and major oil exporter and much of europe's gas and a lot of economic dependence on the part of europe in russia. i think the option are going to be limited. i'm all in favor of kicking him out of the g-8 and not going to sochi and limiting the visas and i hope contain what they are doing what they are doing in crimea but i think kidding ourselves that they are going to march out. it's not going to happen. >> how seriously is the white house taking this? do they think this is bluster or do they think this is vladimir putin pushing the boundaried with the west? >> they do not think it's bluster. thousands of russian forces are in crimea. one of the things the administration is watching closely is do those forces go into other parts of ukraine? there are big russian speaking populations in eastern ukraine. does putin try to contain his activities to crimea or move elsewhere? the biggest option on the table from the white house is sanctions. this would be to top russian officials that are involved in this advance into ukraine. but when you talk about sanct
the northern plains and the upper midwest. so our storm system, part of the energy is going to make its way out into the plains and give us over a foot of snow and, of course, heavy downpours for the southern california area. across the plains, great lakes, across the northeast, that's where the next storm system, next round of snow is going to end up and you're going to see the potential for icing. an ice storm across the ohio river valley, the tennessee river valley over the next 12 to 24 hours. south of st. louis through nashville, mid-atlantic, south of d.c., that's where we're going to see that icing and then north of that significant snow. we'll keep you posted. multifaceted storm that originates across the midwest. >> thank you so much. >> you go it. >>> senate majority leader harry reid is igniting a huge firestorm saying that stories told by president obama is just lies looking to grab headlines. republicans are hitting back and says that every week the administration seems to break another promise about obamacare. elizabeth brand has that story from washington. >> white house press se
at the radar. some of this energy is moving across the southwest, and fueling our next snowstorm and ice storm unfortunately across the central u.s. you see the pinks on the korean. that's where the freezing rain and sleet is falling. north of that is where we have the heavy snow, and in some cases we could certainly see up for to a foot of snow. look at the cold front. this is meteorology 101. you can really see it. it's a powerful arctic front. these are current temperatures, not windchills in the single digits and the minus digits here. 35 in memphis. that's where we're sealing that icy mixture. ahead of that very warm, unestablish are stable area. but again dangerous windchills where it feels minus teens, minus 20s across the northern plains. this winter could be one of the coldest on record for the northern plains and upper midwest. back to you, eric. >>> just promise spring. spring and summer will be here -- >> soon. i think it's like 18 days officially on the calendar. >>> unbelievable. >>> the pentagon is planning to cut the size of the u.s. army to levels that have been unseen in near
with areas that might get impacted. europe relies on the ukraine for energy and food. they are an important producer of both of these things. are you concerned about the ripple effects? >> yes, it really starts with collateral damage there. some of the countries are in the cloak of crisis, the more that their stock prices are following. i think you pointed out a great point. emerging rockets both on the stock side and the on-site have been lacking for months. the silver lining is kind of like, the u.s. again becomes the strongest guy or gal, however you want to do, at the beach. things are stable here. the economy is growing. steve and i had someone say it charlie gasparino said that if i was an individual of his upmarket, with full on money money out. so i think that the market is in particular a bull market and it will not end until the conditions star in this. the economy is not too hot, it's not too slow. then we have the fed easing as well. gerri: it's great to have these conversations tonight. thank you so much for coming on. we appreciate all of you being here. thank you. and still t
of financial transparency and accountability and end expensive government energy subsidies. >> we will complete all the conditions. i repeat, all the conditions, that are necessary for this loan. >> managing director of the imf christine la guard says there's no need for panic. adding the imf and others including the united states who are ready to help ukraine need time to assess the state of the finances, joy. >> and finally, help from little ukraine. >> we are really helping people to get what they want. >> from tips to prayers, we tryst new york visit the new al jazeera america. >> finally in our special programming now, new york's east village is well-known for its vibrant fight life but also home for tens of thousands of ukrainians who have migrated there over the past century. christof putzel reports, they worry about their home land but also the family and friends that are still there. >> it is a chilly friday night in manhattan's east village. these these ukrainians are mix ing mixing drinks with politics. working to support ukrainian nationalism from abroad. >> we are together because
this together and resist pressure on in terms of rising energy prices and also the threat of military force, that they can resist pressure from vladimir putin. he was strikingly passion nal having had the moving experience of walking by the square where the resistance took place, seeing the barricade still there, seeing the tires and barbed wire and flower for the martl mart martyrs, the heavenly hundred, all men and one woman who died in the sniper fire. it was an emotional day and business of trying to meet with interim leaders and tell them that the united states will stand with them $1 billion in loan guarantees. there has been some softening among the allies. here's you've got kerry and the president saying that vladimir putin will be isolated from the world economically and politically by his fans and by having operational control illegally says the united states in crimea. but putin was certainly defiant today taking questions for an hour and showing no sense of reality tomorrow. denying the troops were even in crimea. there's no sign that putin is taking note of this pressure from t
most. but i know you'll still find it when you know where to look. but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell
to the mediterranean. many countries, particularly in the eastern europe, get faster amounts of fuel and energy from russia. this is a very complicated spider's web financially. >> what's being discussed are sanctions. christine romans, what kind of effect can this have on russia. >> russia sells all the gas and oil. it gets paid. if they are going to have some sort of dispute on aland gas with europe or is going to shut off oil and gas again to ukraine, it hurts itself. >> it does. you would have thought so. but, there are plenty of other places in the world where they can sell that. look down towards the east. look down towards southeast asia. and, don't forget, if there is disruption in the oil market, what happens to the price. >> it goes up. >> who gains if it goes up. >> russia. if you are a seller. >> the imaginations and permations, sanctions, the u.s. is fot wanting to shut russia out, for good cause. they are big players in the london financial markets. sanctions is always a policy that turns into somebody refuses to join in. >> vladmir putin already said yesterday very simply, we are all
and thunderstorms, gusts up to 60 miles per hour, enough energy in the lower atmosphere to twist a little. so we could see some waterspouts becoming coastal tornados. weak but something pretty wild. and rain, almost all day on saturday, too. so here's the deal. you put four to six inches of rain very quickly, i mean an inch an hour at times on the mountains, you're going to pick up close to a half foot in places like glendora, california, where they have had a fire recently, that's going to be an issue and that's where we find david wright this morning. >> reporter: good morning, ginger. this neighborhood just survived those winter wild fires a couple of weeks ago. now they're nervous about possible mudslides. as you can see the whole place looks like a fortress here bracing for what may come. it's california's worst drought in 150 years and the rains are coming. about to pose serious problems of their own. >> one thing after another. the fire was one thing but we've got another one right behind it. >> reporter: some areas that faced wildfires last month are now bracing for mudslides. >> a lot o
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